The Front Blog

Conversations from the Four Rivers Region

Posts Tagged ‘paducah

the morning cram [the I don’t know how to put this but I’m kind of a big deal edition]

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Gentlemen, telling the ladies that you have a Silver Star, Purple Heart and the Congressional Medal of Honor may get you more than shot down at the bar…

NPR reports the Supreme Court is considering whether or not claiming you’ve won medals could get you thrown in the clink.

Kentucky~ Paducah officials want to reevaluate the areas earthquake risk.  Senator Paul does some pro bono surgery in Paducah.A Paducah juvenile was arrested for burning down three homes. State officials debate the drop out age bill. The UPIKE debate continues.

Tennessee~ The “Don’t Say Gay” bill loses some momentum.

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Datebook: February 21 – Waldo Waterman’s Flying Car Lifts Off 75 Years Ago

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What ever happened to the flying car? Why don’t we live like the Jetsons today? Waldo Waterman invented the first tailless monoplane, the first aircraft with modern tricycle landing gear, and the first successful low cost and simple to fly flying car. The idea behind the Arrowbile was to develop a transmission drive system that could operate the propeller for flight and the rear wheels for groudn operation. The aircraft was required to meet the certification standards of thee Bureau of Air Commerce. Waldo used readily available auto components for most of the vehicle. The only device used for flight control was a wheel yoke suspended from the cabin – the same used to turn the nose wheel in ground operation. Waterman flew the first test flight of the Arrowbile on February 21, 1937, and found the aircraft easy to fly and virtually spin and stall proof. The price tag was $3,000 (over $45,000 today). Waldo continued to improve his design over the next few decades. In 1957, the aircraft was listed in the experimental category, but the market had vanished. His flying car can be seen at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum.

It’s Tuesday, February 21

Jian Ping, the author of “Mulberry Child: A Memoir of China,” gives a reading on Thursday at 7:30PM in the Clara M. Eagle Art Gallery. The reading is free and open to the public, with a book signing and reception to follow at the Faculty Club. The film adaptation of the book will be shown tomorrow at 7:30 in the Alexander Hall Auditorium.

The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network holds a meeting Thursday evening at 6:30 at The Legacy Personal Care Home in Paducah. The meeting is open to supporters, pancreatic cancer survivors, caregivers, and those interested in joining the fight against pancreatic cancer. To learn more, visit pancan.org.

Playhouse in the Park presents “13” Friday and Saturday at 7PM and on Sunday at 2:30. The high-energy musical is about discovering that cool is where you find it, and sometimes where you least expect it. Reserve tickets by calling the Playhouse at 759-1752.

Find more about these and other community events at wkms.org, and thanks for listening.

Written by Matt Markgraf

February 21, 2012 at 10:56 am

the morning cram [the wrong, commie… it’s Houston! edition]

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“In Russia we only had two TV channels. Channel One was propaganda. Channel Two consisted of a KGB officer telling you: Turn back at once to Channel One.”

NPR reports signs of a media crackdown in Russia as the country nears its presidential elections.

Kentucky~ Murray State trumps Saint Mary’s at Saturday’s  ESPN Bracketbuster game. The death of a 14-year-old Christian County girl has sparks a movement against bullying and suicide.  The closing of Madisonville’s medical examiner’s office is causing an outrage. A little-known 2001 law could have prevented an infant’s death and a teen mother’s arrest. The Delta Mariner resumes its voyage to Cape Canaveral. Educators from 17 states come to learn about the state’s new education standards.

Tennessee~ A new bill may help military spouses facing unemployment.

the morning cram [the back off, I’m starving edition]

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Big Pharma gets a do-over…

NPR reports the FDA isn’t pulling any punches while they reevaluate weight loss drugs previously denied because of side-effects. Sure you’ll grow a third ear, but at least you’ll be skinny!

Kentucky~ Paducah and McCracken County are still considering a merger.  Local counties get some cash for recreational trail programs. Felons may get the chance to vote.

Datebook: February 15 – Fall of Singapore 70 Years Ago

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During World War II, Singapore was a major British military base, nicknamed “Gibralter of the East.” It was considered an impregnable fortress and it’s fall, was a major blow to British forces. Prime Minister Winston Churchill called the defeat to the Japanese the “worst disaster” and “largest capitulation” in British history. Indeed, roughly 62,000 troops were taken prisoner and more than half had died as POWs. Singapore had been a British colony since the 19th Century. On February 8th, the first wave of Japanese troops landed on the island, outgunning British defense. By February 13, most of the island’s defensive weaponry had been destroyed by air, land, and sea troops. On the morning of February 15, Japanese troops broke through the last line of defense, by evening Lieutenant-General Arthur Percival surrendered to General Tomoyuki Yamashita. This was a triumphant victory for Japan. During their occupation, the island was renamed Syonanto. Many of the captured Indian troops, which had fought for the British, were recruited to fight for the Japanese in the Burma Campaign. Occupation ended after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, along with the entry of the Soviet Union into the war. Singapore was returned to the British, and remained under their weakened control until self-governance in the late 1950s and the merger with Malaysia in the 1960s. Yamashita was convicted of war crimes by the US and hanged on February 23, 1946.

It’s Wednesday, February 15

Children ages six to twelve can learn about the magic of light and sound at this week’s WKCTC Friday Night Science event. Discover the science behind light and sound by making an aluminum rod sing and creating a rainbow. The cost is twenty dollars. The two-hour class begins at 5PM. To register, call 270-534-3335.

Maiden Alley Cinema in Paducah presents “The Descendants,” starring George Clooney, tonight at 7. The film’s protagonist tries to re-connect with his two daughters after his wife suffers severe head trauma during a boat race. The movie plays through Sunday; find more information and additional showtimes at maidenalleycinema.com.

Graves County High School features a number of its graduates as performers in “All Hearts Come Home.” The alumni show is Friday at 7PM at the Performing Arts Center, located next to the high school. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for students.

Tomorrow at noon on WKMS, hear “Say It Loud,” a radio documentary featuring historically important speeches by African Americans. Learn more at wkms.org.

Written by Matt Markgraf

February 15, 2012 at 9:01 am

the morning cram [the double secret probation edition]

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Surprise! Big schools bring in big money.

NPR reports Harvard and Yale once again top the list of colleges for money received in 2011.

Kentucky~ Gov. Steve Beshear defends Paducah’s nuclear-enrichment plant. The University of Pikeville could become a part of the state’s higher education system. The House approves an Amish buggy bill. New legislation could give whistleblowers a cash reward. A teen is charged with killing her newborn child. Surface mining opponents rally in Frankfort. Paducah’s Fountain Avenue comes a step closer to restoration.

Datebook: February 13 – World Radio Day

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It’s World Radio Day, adopted by UNESCO in 2011. The proclamation was requested by the Spanish Radio Academy for February 13, on the anniversary of the establishment of United Nations Radio in 1946. Various radio industry bodies around the world are supporting the initiative by encouraging stations in developed countries to assist those in the developing world. See more about World Radio Day on the official website.

See our links page to support a charitable cause. (scroll down a little bit)

It’s Monday, February 13

Wednesday is the application deadline for musicians interested in performing in the 2012 Lower Town Arts & Music Festival. Selected performers will appear on one of three stages during the festival, which runs May 18th through the 20th in Paducah. Applications can be accessed online at lowertownamf.com.

A regular monthly meeting of the Alzheimer’s Support Group takes place tomorrow morning at 10 at the Pennyrile Area Development District Office in Hopkinsville. For more information, contact James Patterson at 886-9484.

The Pennyroyal Area Museum in Hopkinsville displays a collection of African artifacts from Kenya and Tanzania. The exhibit runs through March and features a selection of ebony carvings, a chess set, a bow and arrow, African currency, textiles, and more. The museum, located at 217 East 9th Street, is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 to 4:30 and on Saturday from 10 to 3.

Find out how you can support public radio and get in on a drawing for a Kindle Fire at wkms.org.

Written by Matt Markgraf

February 13, 2012 at 9:13 am