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Posts Tagged ‘murray state university

Datebook: February 17 – Volkswagen Beetle Production Tops Ford Model-Ts 40 Years Ago

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On February 17, 1972, the Volkswagen Beetle overtook the Ford Model-T as the most popular car ever made. On this day, the 15,007,034 car rolled off the assembly line in Germany, making the new record for most highly produced car in history. This record was eventually surpassed by the Toyota Corolla, but there’s no doubt that the Beetle has one of the most recognizable designs, originating in pre-war Nazi Germany to present day – the look of the Beetle has remained largely unchanged. In 1933, Adolf Hitler commissioned Ferdinand Porche to develop a “people’s car,” or Volkswagen – an affordable car (a little over $5,000 dollars today) that can accommodate a family of five. After WWII, VW was seized and handed to the British, who deemed the car unattractive and impracticable. Whether or not you agree, sales figures ultimately decide a product’s fate. Over 21 million cars have been manufactured and sold worldwide. The Beetle ceased production in 2003, but variations like the ‘New Beetle’ and the current Beetle A5 carry the legacy and brand.

It’s Friday, February 17

Immanuel Baptist Church in Paducah dedicates its new pipe organ during a free recital on Sunday at 3PM. Joyce Jones, professor of organ at Baylor University, is the featured performer. A reception will follow the recital. For more information, call 443-5306.

The Stewart County Historical Society offers an evening of Civil War Era music and dancing tonight at 6:30 at Brandon Springs Group Camp in Dover, Tennessee. Period dance instruction will be provided. Dress is casual. Call Don Young at 931-232-7328 for more.

Murray State University hosts the final round of the annual Young Artists Concerto Competition Sunday afternoon at 2. Seven high school musicians will play concerti by Liszt, Mozart, Rachmaninoff, Barber, and others. The winner receives a one thousand dollar cash prize, a music scholarship, and a performance with the Paducah Symphony Orchestra. The competition is in the Performing Arts Hall and is free and open to the public.

Find more community events online at wkms.org. Thanks for listening.

Datebook: February 16 – Fort Donelson Captured 150 Years Ago

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The Battle of Fort Donelson was fought from February 11 to February 16, 1862. The capture of the fort by Union forces opened the Cumberland River as an avenue for the invasion of the South. The success elevated Brig. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant to the rank of major general, and earned him the nickname “Unconditional Surrender” Grant in the process. The battle followed the capture of Fort Henry on February 6. Grant moved his army 12 miles to Fort Donelson on February 12 and conducted several small probing attacks. On February 14, U.S. Navy gunboats under Flag Officer Andrew H. Foote attempted to reduce the fort with naval gunfire, but were forced to withdraw after sustaining heavy damage from Donelson’s water batteries. On February 15 the Confederates, commanded by Brig. Gen. John B. Floyd, launched a surprise attack against Grant’s army, attempting to open an avenue of escape. Grant, rallied his men with a counterattack and forced Floyd back to the fort. On the following morning, the Confederates turned over their command to Brig. Gen. Simon Bolivar Buckner, who agreed to the terms of surrender offered by Grant.

It’s Thursday, February 16

The Murray High School Baseball Team hosts a barbecue lunch on Saturday at 1PM in the fellowship hall of First Baptist Church. Kirk Rueter of the San Francisco Giants will be the guest speaker. The event also features an auction including autographed baseballs and unique items from Murray businesses. Purchase $10 tickets by calling 753-5202.

The annual Bull Blowout is tomorrow and Saturday at 8PM at the Cherry Expo Center at Murray State University. Events include bull riding and barrel racing, as well as a children’s calf scramble and mutton busting. Admission is $12 for adults, $10 for MSU students, and $5 for children under 12.

The Run4Another 5K run/walk will be held on Saturday, March 3, in Murray. All participants registered by tomorrow are guaranteed a free tech shirt and goodie bags. Find online registration, an official route map, and business sponsorship forms at run4another.com.

Find more information about these and other community events at wkms.org, where you can also get in on a drawing for a Big Green Egg.

Written by Matt Markgraf

February 16, 2012 at 8:48 am

Datebook: February 3 – The Day the Music Died

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On February 3, 1959, a small-plane crash near Clear Lake, Iowa, killed three American rock and roll pioneers: Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and J. P. “The Big Bopper” Richardson, as well as the pilot, Roger Peterson. The day was later called “The Day the Music Died” by Don McLean, in his song “American Pie.” The plane crash has been called the first and greatest tragedy rock and roll has ever suffered.

It’s Friday, February 3

Tomorrow, Land Between the Lakes offers the public a one-time opportunity to view the partial collapse of the Eggner’s Ferry Bridge. Highway 68/80 west will be temporarily opened to traffic. Visitors will be directed to park at the Fenton Camping Area and Boat Ramp, and will be allowed to walk in designated areas to view the bridge. Visit lbl.org for more information.

The Murray Art Guild offers a Valentine’s sale of handcrafted jewelry and homemade candy tomorrow from 9AM to 4PM. The sale takes place at the art guild, located at 500 North 4th Street. For more, call 753-4059.

A panel of Murray State University’s first African-American students and faculty will discuss their experiences on Monday at 5:30PM in the Curris Center’s Barkley Lecture Hall. A question and answer session will follow. African-American art by 1971 MSU graduate Elliott Jordan will be on display in the lobby.

Hear a rebroadcast of Maya Angelou’s Black History Month Special Sunday morning at 9 on 91.3 WKMS.

Datebook: February 2 – ‘Ulysses’ Published 90 Years Ago

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Ulysses is a novel by the Irish author James Joyce. Considered one of the most important works of Modernist literature, it has been called “a demonstration and summation of the entire movement,” and, “Before Joyce, no writer of fiction had so foregrounded the process of thinking.” Ulysses chronicles the passage of Leopold Bloom through Dublin during an ordinary day, June 16, 1904. Since publication, the book attracted controversy and scrutiny, ranging from early obscenity trials to protracted textual “Joyce Wars.” Ulysses’ stream-of-consciousness technique, careful structuring, and experimental prose—full of puns, parodies, and allusions, as well as its rich characterizations and broad humor, made the book a highly regarded novel in the Modernist pantheon. In 1998, the Modern Library ranked Ulysses first on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.

It’s Thursday, February 2

Flute-guitar duo Kathleen Karr and Stephen Mattingly will give a recital tomorrow evening at 6 in the Performing Arts Hall on the campus of Murray State University. The program includes works by Italian, French, Argentinean, and American composers. Admission is free. For more information, call the music department at 270-809-4288.

The Western Kentucky Polar Plunge takes place Saturday at 11AM at the Kentucky Dam Village State Resort Park. Solicit donations to benefit Special Olympics athletes, then take a chilly dip in the lake. The minimum contribution is $75 for adults or $50 for youth. Find more online at soky.org.

Land Between the Lakes offers a chance to learn more about the American Civil War during the Fort Henry Anniversary Walk on Saturday from 12:30 to 4PM. Learn about the construction, the battle, and the legacy of Fort Henry during the event’s 150th anniversary. Admission is $4 for adults and $2 for children. Registration is required by calling 924-2020.

Find more community events at wkms.org.

Datebook: January 30 – FDR Turns 130

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Franklin Delano Roosevelt was born on January 30, 1882 (and died April 12, 1945). He was a central figure in world events during the mid-20th century, leading the United States during a time of worldwide economic crisis and world war. FDR’s persistent optimism and activism contributed to a renewal of the national spirit, reflecting his victory over paralytic illness to become the longest serving president in U.S. history. He worked closely with Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin in leading the Allies against Germany and Japan in World War II, but died just as victory was in sight. Roosevelt instituted the New Deal — a variety of programs designed to produce government jobs, economic growth, and bank and transportation reform. The economy improved rapidly from 1933 to 1937, but then relapsed into a deep recession. The bipartisan Conservative Coalition that formed in 1937 prevented and abolished much of the legislation. Major surviving programs include the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and Social Security. During World War II, FDR gave strong diplomatic and financial support to China and Britain, while remaining officially neutral. He provided Lend-Lease aid to countries fighting against Nazi Germany. He called the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor “a date which will live in infamy.” He ordered the Army to inter 100,000 Japanese American civilians. FDR’s New Deal Coalition united labor unions, big city machines, white ethnics, African Americans and rural white Southerners. Roosevelt’s diplomatic impact led to the United Nations and Bretton Woods. Roosevelt is consistently rated by scholars as one of the top three U.S. Presidents.

It’s Monday, January 30

The McCracken County Cooperative Extension Service hosts a free Slow Cooker Cooking Class tomorrow from 11 to noon. Class members will review slow cooking basics, enjoy taste testing, and leave with new ideas and recipes. Call 554-9520 for more information.

The American Red Cross holds a blood drive at the Murray State University Curris Center tomorrow and Wednesday from 9AM to 3PM. Whole blood and double red cell donations will be accepted. Donors must be healthy, at least seventeen years old, and at least 110 pounds. Schedule an appointment and find out more at redcrossblood.org.

High school juniors may now submit applications for Murray State University’s Commonwealth Honors Academy. The three-week summer enrichment experience lets students earn six hours of college credit at no cost. The program runs June 9th to June 30th. The application deadline is March 1st. Applications are online at murraystate.edu/cha.

Find more community events at wkms.org.

LBL’s Eggner’s Ferry Bridge Collapse Updates

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Last Update: 3:45 p.m. Saturday, February 4, 2012 – Removed Outdated Info

Housing Option for MSU Commuter Students Affected by Bridge Damage

from Murray State University press release

Current Murray State University students with a longer and more expensive commute to classes on campus due to the damage to Eggner’s Ferry Bridge now have another option. MSU’s department of housing and residence life has announced that housing spaces on campus are available to rent for the remainder of the semester at a prorated cost. Anyone interested in more information on this opportunity should contact the housing office at (270) 809-2310 or toll free at 1 (877) 551-7774.

Ky Transportation Cabinet Spokesman on Restoring Eggner’s Ferry Bridge

(Shelly Baskin 2012-02-03)

On Thursday, January 26th, the cargo ship Delta Mariner struck an eastern span of the US 68/KY 80 Eggner’s Ferry bridge that crosses Kentucky Lake and the Tennessee River. U.S. Coast Guard officials say the ship was in a shallower recreational channel outside the regular, deeper, shipping lane when it hit the bridge. Luckily, no lives were lost and no injuries were reported. The wider impact has been significant, however, affecting over-the-road transport, personal travel, and even the businesses that rely on the traffic that comes by on Highway 68/80. Officials say they’re working to restore the crossing, but first they have to look at the bridge’s structure before determining the way forward. Shelly Baskin speaks with Kentucky Transportation Cabinet spokesman Keith Todd for some perspective on the process.

Click here to listen to the interview.

Foss Maritime Bridge Update

from press release

The U.S. Coast Guard has approved the plan submitted by Foss Maritime to conduct salvage operations at the Eggner Ferry Bridge. Foss will spend the rest of today on safety briefings for the crew and salvage team, and on safety inspections of equipment. Foss expects to begin operations on Saturday.  The first step once salvage begins is to cut the sections of the bridge at the waterline to free the ship from the subsurface debris. Then the salvage team will work up the side of the ship removing other pieces of the bridge. One piece at a time will be removed. The operation will be done slowly and carefully to assure the safety of the workers and to avoid having any pieces damage the ship. When the ship is free of the underwater debris, it will be moved out of the channel to a protected area where the debris above the waterline will be removed. When all the debris is removed, the ship will be moved to a facility for any needed repairs. At the same time, remaining debris under water will also be removed. No decision has been made on where the debris will be taken.No decision will be made on the location for the ship repair until the debris is removed and the ship is inspected again. Foss Maritime is working in cooperation with the U.S. Coast Guard and the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet to safely and efficiently conduct salvage operations. There is no estimate of the amount of time each step will take. Our primary focus is to assure the safety of the public and the responders throughout the operation.T&T Bisso is the Foss contractor overseeing the salvage operation.

LBL Info

LBL reminds the public all other LBL facilities normally open at this time are operating as normal, except Turkey Bay Off-Highway Vehicle Area and Trails due to saturated soil conditions. Please visit http://www.lbl.org for outdoor recreation, program information, spring Calendar of Events, and any Alerts & Notices. Land Between The Lakes is managed by the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, to provide outdoor recreation and environmental education for the public to enjoy. Additional information is available on LBL’s official website at http://www.lbl.org, or by calling 1-800-LBL-7077 or 270-924-2000.

Bridge Detour Routes

With the collapse of the US68/KY80 Eggner’s Ferry Bridge spanning Kentucky Lake, the only way around is either north at the I-24 crossing, or south in Tennessee at the Hwy 79 crossing. Western Kentucky residents heading east who live closer to the Tennessee border would be served best heading down to Hwy 79 either on Hwy 121 south or US 641, then taking 79 east towards Clarksville intersecting with I-24. Those who are north of Mayfield or Benton would need to head north on the Purchase Parkway intersecting with I-24 there.

The Kentucky State Police request that motorist who normally travel westbound on US 68 through the Land between the Lakes to please avoid LBL and KY 453 or The Trace as well as US 68.


About the Bridge

The two-lane bridge – formally the Eggners Ferry Bridge – opened to traffic in 1932. Its elevation was raised in 1943 when the Tennessee River was impounded to create Kentucky Lake. A KYTC traffic count conducted in 2009 showed 2,650 vehicles per day crossed the bridge. The Transportation Cabinet is in the process of replacing the bridge, along with the nearby bridge over Lake Barkley on the eastern side of Land Between the Lakes. Pre-construction work, including geo-technical drilling, began months ago. Gov. Steve Beshear’s recommended highway plan, which he sent to the General Assembly on Jan. 17, contains $165 million in construction funding for a new Kentucky Lake bridge from 2013 through 2015.

About the Delta Mariner

According to the Foss Maritime Company website, the Delta Mariner is a 312-foot long and 8,000 horsepower supply ship that transports space-bound hardware, including common booster cores, for the Boeing Delta IV rocket program. It’s designed to navigate shallow inland waterways and the open ocean. The ship hauls rocket components 550 miles from the Boeing factory in Decatur, Alabama, down the Tennessee-Tombigbee waterway to Mobile Bay and the Gulf of Mexico, through the Panama Canal, arriving at the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. According to a press release by the Foss Maritime Company, the ship has not been involved in any serious incidents similar to this one in the past. The Delta Mariner carries a crew of 16 individuals.

Statement from United Launch Alliance:
“The 312-foot vessel was carrying a United Launch Alliance Atlas booster and Centaur upper stage for the Air Force’s AEHF-2 mission scheduled to launch in April and an interstage adapter for NASA’s RBSP mission scheduled to launch in August. There is no schedule impact to either launch date expected at this point.The Mariner cargo area of the ship and the flight hardware did not experience any damage. The hardware is well instrumented and all data from these instruments is being reviewed to confirm that there were no issues.The Delta Mariner was commissioned in 2002 to transport flight hardware from the United Launch Alliance factory in Decatur, Ala., to launch sites at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., and Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.”

See photos of the Delta Mariner on Flickr.

Gov. Beshear Directs Immediate Development of Options:

Governor Steve Beshear today announced the immediate review of options for restoring the US 68/KY 80 bridge over Kentucky Lake after a large vessel struck the span last night and destroyed a main truss. Lieutenant Governor Jerry Abramson and Kentucky Transportation Cabinet Secretary Mike Hancock will visit the bridge today and talk with local officials about the investigation, alternate routing, and impact on nearby communities. “We are grateful that this wreck caused no injuries or loss of life. Since that bridge carries 2,800 cars every day, we were very fortunate that no one was on the span at that time,” said Gov. Beshear. “We’ll turn our attention to a full inspection of the bridge and determine what steps we can take next to speed up the replacement of that important artery.” Lt. Gov. Abramson and Secretary Hancock will be visiting the command center near site of bridge accident and collapse today, to discuss investigation and future options for bridge.

Leaders Respond:

Sen. Bob Leeper, of Paducah: “I appreciate the quick response by the Governor and Kentucky Transportation Cabinet to help this situation in western Kentucky. I look forward to working with them to explore all the available possibilities for a solution for the transportation needs of this area.”

Sen. Ken Winters, of Murray: “I encourage our citizens to remain calm and patient as our state transportation officials investigate the structure and determine next steps. I thank the Governor and Transportation Secretary for their immediate attention to this matter, and I hope that they will fully explore many alternatives, even temporary bridges, to best serve the people of western Kentucky.”

Rep. Will Coursey, of Symsonia: “I think Governor Beshear’s plan for an immediate review of our available options is an excellent first step in getting this bridge back open. I have been working with House leaders to see what more we can do while we are in legislative session, and want the people to know that the General Assembly stands ready to act.”

Sec. Hancock: “At this moment, we’re assessing the situation to see whether repair is feasible. We also will be exploring whether construction of the new bridge can be accelerated.”

Lt. Gov. Abramson: “We had already committed in our new six-year highway plan to replace this bridge, because we know what an important route it is for our citizens in western Kentucky. We will shift our focus to determining how to restore that route as quickly and safely as we can.”

Governor Steve Beshear:  “We are grateful that this wreck caused no injuries or loss of life. Since that bridge carries 2,800 cars every day, we were very fortunate that no one was on the span at that time. We’ll turn our attention to a full inspection of the bridge and determine what steps we can take next to speed up the replacement of that important artery.”

U.S. Senator Rand Paul: “I am relieved that it appears no one was hurt in the accident. I have used the bridge many times and know how big of an inconvenience it will be for people to take the long way around the lakes. I will visit the bridge today to meet with local officials and find out what happened and what must happen to get the road reopened, and I will do what I can to help with this situation.” Senator Paul visited the site Friday to speak with media.

U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell: “I am thankful that reports indicate no one was injured in last night’s cargo ship accident at Eggner Ferry Bridge.  My office remains in contact with state officials and I have sent a staff member to the scene to update me. I will continue to closely monitor the situation.”

U.S. Congressman Ed Whitfield: “I join my fellow Kentuckians in giving thanks that there were no injuries or loss of life from this terrible accident. I will continue to monitor the situation and work to ensure all Federal agencies with jurisdiction remain on top of this incident so that this vital roadway is restored as soon as possible.” Congressman Whitfield visited the site Friday to speak with media.

the morning cram [get out!! edition]

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Occupy LA is no more after police attacked in the night and arrested around 200.

NPR reports around 1400 LA Police officers raided the Occupy LA camp last night, arresting 200 in an overwhelming show of force.

Kentucky~ Ballard County names interim superintendent.  Former KCTC Prez gets a settlement. We’re reaching out to farmers in Benton. KSP wants your food in their car.

Illinois~ A pension bill is on Gov Quinn’s desk.