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Datebook: January 13 – William Brydon Becomes Sole Survivor of First Anglo-Afghan War 160 Years Ago

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The First Anglo-Afghan War was fought between British India and Afghanistan from 1839 to 1842. It was one of the first major conflicts during the Great Game, the 19th century competition for power and influence in Central Asia between the United Kingdom and Russia, and also marked one of the worst setbacks inflicted on British power in the region after the consolidation of British Raj by the East India Company. It is considered one of Britain’s worst disasters in Asia before Japan’s invasion of Malaya and capture of Singapore during World War II. The final stand took place at Gandamak on the morning of January 13, 1842 in the snow. 20 officers and 45 British soldiers, found themselves surrounded on a hillock. The Afghans attempted to persuade the soldiers that they intended them no harm. Then the sniping began, followed by a series of rushes. Captain Souter wrapped the regimental colors around his body and was dragged into captivity with two or three soldiers. The remainder were shot or cut down. Only 6 mounted officers escaped. Of these, 5 were murdered along the road. In the afternoon, the British troops in Jalalabad, watching for their comrades of the Kabul garrison, saw a single figure ride up to the town walls. It was Dr. William Brydon, an assistant surgeon. Part of his skull had been sheared off by an Afghan sword and he survived only because he had stuffed a copy of Blackwood’s Magazine into his hat to fight the intense cold weather. The magazine took most of the blow, saving the doctor’s life. He was the only member of the army of 4,500 men to reach safety at the British garrison.

It’s Friday, January 13

Monday the Paducah Chapter of the NAACP’s Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration starts at 10:15 a.m. with a march from the Robert Cherry Civic Center proceeding east along Park Avenue to the MLK Monument for a wreath laying. The annual luncheon follows at the Civic Center.

Henry Countians commemorate Monday’s holiday with a prayer breakfast at Quinn Chapel AME Church at 218 Church Street in Paris followed by a march from there to the Henry County Court House for more speaking. At 6 p.m.Rev. Thomas Taylor, Union Grove Baptist Church keynotes at the closing ceremony for the day at Allen Temple CME Church on Warren Street.

Murray’s Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast begins at 8 a.m. Monday at the Woodman of the World, 330 CC Lowry Drive. MSU students participate in a day of service from noon to 5. At 10 a.m. Pastor Rinzee Stansberry of Mount Olive Baptist Church in Ridgeway, South Carolina remembers Dr. King in the Curris Center Ballroom.

See details at wkms.org. Thanks!

the morning cram [the sometimes you win, sometimes you lose and sometimes it rains edition]

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The Occupy movement is changing.

NPR reports the movement is attempting to discover the next phase of their nationwide movement.

Kentucky~A local High School is headed to the State Championships- Go Cardinals!  The Paducah CVB offers help to the expo center. Hospital officials don’t want us to know the details of their merger.  Sen. Paul looks to save small river ports with his new bill.

Illinois~ Metropolis may be changing healthcare companies.

Tennessee ~ Henry County went door to door checking up on sex offenders.

Datebook: September 6 – McKinley Fatally Shot 110 Years Ago

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The assassination of President William McKinley occurred on September 6, 1901, during a meet and greet at the Temple of Music on the grounds of the 1901 Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, New York. He was shot twice by anarchist Leon Czolgosz. Initially, he appeared to be recovering from his wounds, but died on September 14, 1901, and was succeeded by Vice President Theodore Roosevelt. After McKinley’s murder, Congress passed legislation to officially charge the Secret Service with the responsibility of providing physical protection for U.S. presidents.

It’s Tuesday, September 6

Glema Mahr Center for the Arts commemorates the 10th anniversary of the events which occurred on September 11, 2001 with a combined community choir and orchestra program at 6 p.m. Sunday. Special guests are composer and soloist Dr. Mike Harland and soloist Teresa Harland. The Glema Mahr Center is on the campus of Madisonville Community College.

The Paris Henry County Arts Council presents the Bethel University Renaissance Theatre production of “Steel Magnolias”. The play starts at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Krider Performing Arts Center 650 Volunteer Drive, Paris. Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for students 18 and under.

Hopkinsville Mayor Dan Kemp hosts a Community Conversation next Monday from 5:15 to 7 p.m. at Hopkinsville Middle School. The program includes details of the new city building and other projects. The Hopkinsville High School Choir performs and there will be light refreshments as well as a door prize handcrafted by a local artist.

See details at wkms.org. Thanks for listening.

the morning cram [sickly coral edition]

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Evolution kicks it into high gear: Coral can now get sick from humans.

NPR reports that bacteria in the human gut is making Caribbean Coral sick and is making its way into the ocean through sewage runoff.

Kentucky~ Purchase kids are pulling out the stops on their ACT’s. Todd P’Pool gets some backing from Virginia’s Attorney General. Man kills himself and daughter. A huge hospital merger may change reproductive options for women. Early Childhood Education advocates say don’t forget the country.

Illinois~ The Cairo bridge is a no no this morning. Jesse White says the fifth term is the charm.

Tennessee~ Henry County officials were audited for taking the drug dealer’s seized car for a spin. A Tennessee man commits the first self-inflicted drive-by. Tennesseans asked to evaluate their kids’ textbooks.

the morning cram [nuclear wasteland edition]

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In Sweden, nuclear waste disposal sites have become tourist attractions.

NPR reports that the Swedish nuclear industry has taken its toxic waste sites from protested hidden facilities to scientific field trip locations.

Kentucky~ A Paducah kid won another karate contest (I wouldn’t mess with him). Lanes are closed on US 45 in Paducah. Daviess County is becoming more disabled friendly. More Post Office closings are predicted (say it ain’t so Ms. Cleo). Guardsman Miller gets life for murder. Jack Conway is suing Daymar for screwing college kids.

Tennessee~ A man is crossing the nation on horseback (WHOA NELLY!). Blue Cross Blue Shield says stolen info hasn’t been used.

the morning cram [deadly GPS edition]

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Could over-dependency on GPS guidance systems lead you to your death?

NPR reports that sometimes GPS systems are wrong, and when that happens in the wrong place, it could end up being fatal.

Kentucky~ No smoking in Murray schools (not even in the boys room). A Symsonia woman died in a car accident. KY 121 Bypass is closed in Mayfield. Trials begin today for Fort Campbell soldier. State officials are meeting to figure out the finances (good luck). The state pays too much for meds too. More homes are empty throughout the state.

Illinois~ Papayas can make you sick.

Tennessee~ Clarksville water tastes “earthy” (yum). A Henry County man drowned in Kentucky Lake. The state gets more money for education.