The Front Blog

Conversations from the Four Rivers Region

Posts Tagged ‘DOE

the morning cram [the double secret probation edition]

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Surprise! Big schools bring in big money.

NPR reports Harvard and Yale once again top the list of colleges for money received in 2011.

Kentucky~ Gov. Steve Beshear defends Paducah’s nuclear-enrichment plant. The University of Pikeville could become a part of the state’s higher education system. The House approves an Amish buggy bill. New legislation could give whistleblowers a cash reward. A teen is charged with killing her newborn child. Surface mining opponents rally in Frankfort. Paducah’s Fountain Avenue comes a step closer to restoration.

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morning cram [8.9 edition]

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A 30-foot tsunami triggered by one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded smashed into Japan’s eastern coast Thursday.

NPR reports the body count continues to climb.

KENTUCKY~ Police and a towboat crew spot then recover a US-60 bridge jumper. Calloway High’s girls basketball team advances in the state championships. State fire investigators still don’t know what caused the Talon Falls (Halloween attraction) blaze. Another Fort Campbell soldier dies in Afghanistan, while hundreds return to base.  Early rainfall makes a local farmer smile. Williams accuses Beshear of calling senators ‘fat’. US Representative Ed Whitfield files a bill to protect Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant workers’ pensions. The state loses another longtime statesman to the private sector.

morning cram [hot money edition]

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With the US and other first-world economies deep in debt and growing sluggishly, most of the world’s economic expansion is now coming from developing nations.

NPR reports many of those nations are safeguarding against a ‘hot money’ bubble.

KENTUCKY~ Those sirens you heard this morning were only a test. The thousand-plus acres surrounding Paducah’s Gaseous Diffusion Plant could soon become publicly accessible. Official: Murray Hospital’s smoke-free policy is ‘unenforcible‘. A Marshall County man gets 10 years for DUI/manslaughter. Hopkinsville hires a new High School football coach. A proposed law that would make many cold meds require a prescription fails. The General Assembly could actually hammer out a Medicaid budget deal today. One lawmaker thinks in a couple years the Commonwealth can handle reforming its tax system.

TENNESSEE~ Henry County indicts the Buchanan double-murder suspect. UT’s faculty senate opposes legislation that would allow staff to carry handguns.

The Front Page [01.21.10]

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A weekly on-air/online magazine from WKMS News.

The Q&A – the Jackson Purchase during the Civil War 

The Jackson Purchase Historical Society holds its first meeting of 2011 Saturday at Wrather Museum on Murray State’s campus. And in honor of the U.S. Civil War Sesquicentennial, the speaker will be MSU history professor, Civil War historian, and Fulbright scholar Dr. William Mulligan. He sits down with us first to talk about the war’s relevance and the role the Jackson Purchase played in the conflict.


Department of Energy Reaches Out on PGDP Site’s Future 

During a pair of US Department of Energy public information events this week in Paducah, Energy and environmental cleanup contractor officials talked to many area residents about the future of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site. DOE Site Leader Reinhard Knerr walks Reporter Chris Taylor through the mass of details.


Agriculture Business Changes as Area Farmers Grow Older 

Kentucky has 124-thousand farmers, the sixth largest number in the nation. But the number of farm operators has been declining steadily; the U. S. Census Bureau reports in the past decade 4,000 Kentucky farms went out of business. Fewer people are farming the Commonwealth’s land, and those still on the farm are growing gray, literally. The average age of the western Kentucky farmer is 57 . . . and getting older.

Beshear’s Plan to Balance the Medicaid Budget Garners Mixed Reviews 

Gov. Steve Beshear’s plan for balancing Kentucky’s Medicaid budget is getting mixed reviews in Frankfort. Kentucky Public Radio’s Tony McVeigh looks at the proposal, its backers, and biggest critic.


Conversation with Jacklyn Marceau, author of Stripped 

Jacklyn Marceau teaches at Stephens College for women in central Missouri. She’s also a stripper, a mother, a feminist, and a product of Murray State University’s Master of Fine Arts Program in Creative Writing. Louisville’s Typecast Publishing has picked up her memoir Stripped, about her life as an exotic dancer. Marceau sat down with Jacque Day in our studios to discuss her book and the many concurrent paths of her life.


Movie Review: “The King’s Speech” 

Some people, and you may be one of them, have difficulties speaking in public. But just imagine the anxiety you’d have if you had to speak to an entire nation…and had a stammer. An Englishman called Bertie found himself in just that predicament when he became King George VI in 1936. The new film The King’s Speech is the story of how he overcame that hurdle with the help of unorthodox Australian speech therapist Lionel Logue. Larry Thomas brings us this review.

Datebook: January 13 – Old New Year’s Eve

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It’s Thursday, January 13.

Next week the U.S. Department of Energy hosts two public inquiry meetings about its evaluation of what to do with materials expected to be generated by facility decontamination and decommissioning—as well as future environmental cleanup actions at the Paducah Site.  The first meeting is 4 to 7 p.m. Tuesday at Heath High School Cafeteria.  The second meeting is 4 to 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Emerging Technology Center at WKCTC in Paducah.

A Half Marathon Training program starts Saturday at 9 a.m. and continues every Saturday for preparing for the April 16th Murray Half Marathon.  The training program includes a group run and costs $30 for members of the Center for Health and Wellness on Poplar, where it convenes.  $60 for non-members.

This evening Market House Theatre in Paducah opens its two weekend presentation of The Complete Works of William Shakespeare Abridged.  Shows are at 7:30 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays and 2:30 p.m. Sundays.  Get tickets at mhtplay.com.

Thanks for being with us today.  See wkms.org for more community events.

morning cram [yoda bat edition]

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Topping a list of the strangest creatures discovered this year is a bat that looks a like a George Lucas creation.

~See a photo of the creature on NPR‘s The Two Way.

KENTUCKY~ Some SIU-Carbondale students have ‘strong’ ideas on how to better Paducah’s riverfront. A newly contracted firm will be working to get rid of thousands of nuclear containers stored in Paducah. I-24’s Welcome Center is back open. After 3 years in office, Governor Steve Beshear says he’s “energized” (in time for re-election). Gubernatorial candidate Phil Moffett will fund-raise in Florida next week.

TENNESSEE~ UTM plans to erect a new radio tower. Someone drops a +$1.5k coin into a Salvation Army kettle (for a 3rd year in a row). Paris plans to build a safety shelter for severe weather. Henry County is declared an agricultural disaster zone. State sales tax revenue continues to defy predictors. In OVC Basketball.. (Men’s) UTM > Central Arkansas; (Women’s) APSU < Lipscomb.

morning cram [youth vote edition]

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The White House is trying this week to re-energize college students and young voters who played a big role in electing President Obama two years ago.

~NPR reports polls show Democrats still lead the youth vote, though not by the record margin they did in 2008.

KENTUCKY~ Police search for a band of ruffians who tied up and robbed an elderly lady. An investigation report is due out tomorrow on Paducah’s halfway house escapes and nearby Kentucky Oaks Mall has a couple new stores opening up next month. Calloway County’s 911 system will stand on its own. A family gives Murray State University $1.3mil. Paving begins on a short stretch of US-68 tomorrow near Draffenville. A coal company gets a pat on the back for it’s environmental efforts. Fort Campbell prepares to deploy another 4k soldiers. Federal regulators greenlight Paducah’s Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility and a study is released finding a higher average of past employees died from leukemia and lymphoma.

TENNESSEE~ A man pleads guilty to a Clarksville 2006 double murder. A man dies in a high speed Montgomery County wreck. One institute has committed over $9mil for business solar grants.