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Archive for August 31st, 2011

Good Read – Bright’s Passage by Josh Ritter

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Bright’s Passage
by Josh Ritter

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Product Description:

Henry Bright is newly returned to West Virginia from the battlefields of the First World War. Grief struck by the death of his young wife and unsure of how to care for the infant son she left behind, Bright is soon confronted by the destruction of the only home he’s ever known. His only hope for safety is the angel who has followed him to Appalachia from the trenches of France and who now promises to protect him and his son. Together, Bright and his newborn, along with a cantankerous goat and the angel guiding them, make their way through a landscape ravaged by forest fire toward an uncertain salvation, haunted by the abiding nightmare of his experiences in the war and shadowed by his dead wife’s father, the Colonel, and his two brutal sons.


Rose Krzton-Presson says:

Josh Ritter’s debut novel Bright’s Passage is not a disappointment for fans of his music. His prose echoes the intricacy of his song lyrics and Ritter seems to have mastered delicately juxtaposing everything in this book. Henry Bright is able to face his murderous family members, but is terrified at the thought of raising his newborn son alone. The story is able to whip back to a misty Appalachian morning after an explosive scene in muddy trenches of France during WWI. Set in West Virginia, Bright’s Passage is steeped in Ritter’s true Americana style with a sense of upstanding nobility given to the local culture. The book also brings religion and morality into question. With a guardian angel (or a hallucination of a talking horse brought upon by PTSD, depending on the reader’s interpretation) that doesn’t always keep Bright out of harm’s way, Ritter presents a very interesting religious situation, with no particular slant. The freshman novelist has room to improve. Bright’s Passage has some some loose ends and fuzzy plot points. But if Ritter’s last decade of musical growth is any sign of his writing improvements to come, he is sure to join Twain and Poe as one of the great American artists.

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Written by Matt Markgraf

August 31, 2011 at 12:01 pm

Datebook – August 31 – Hermann von Helmholtz turns 190

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Hermann von Helmholtz was born August 31, 1821 (and died September 8, 1894). He was a German physician and physicist who made significant contributions to several widely varied areas of modern science. In physiology and psychology, he is known for his mathematics of the eye, theories of vision, ideas on the visual perception of space, color vision research, and on the sensation of tone, perception of sound, and empiricism. In physics, he is known for his theories on the conservation of energy, work in electrodynamics, chemical thermodynamics, and on a mechanical foundation of thermodynamics. As a philosopher, he is known for his philosophy of science, ideas on the relation between the laws of perception and the laws of nature, the science of aesthetics, and ideas on the civilizing power of science.

It’s Wednesday, August 31

Market House Theatre opens its 48th season with the Tony Award winning play the 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee starting tomorrow night, running through September 18. Shows are at 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and at 2:30 p.m. Sundays. For tickets go online at www.mhtplay.com.

Fort Donelson National Battlefield hosts a living history encampment at the main unit along Highway 79 in Dover, Tennessee – open 10 to 4 Saturday and Sunday. It’s the 150th anniversary of this Confederate fort’s being built. At 11 a.m. Saturday Junior Rangers learn about journalists and artists who covered the battles. Register for this program today at 931-232-5706.

Owensboro Museum of Fine Arts opens a visual arts celebration of Bill Monroe’s 100th Birthday titled Bluegrass Roots over Labor Day Weekend. Four concurrent exhibitions open with a preview gala and artist’s reception Saturday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The museum’s at 9th and Frederica Street. See omfa.us.

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the morning cram [the bomb squad edition]

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US soldiers are training Afghan soldiers to take over bomb diffusion duties.

NPR reports as US troops are preparing for a reduction in troops in Afghanistan, more Afghan soldiers are being trained to diffuse the insurgent weapon of choice.

Kentucky~ Prisoners will work in state parks. They can also get alcohol there apparently. A Fort Campbell soldier settled in his police brutality case. Soldiers received Purple Hearts yesterday.

Tennessee~ TennCare could see massive losses.