The Front Blog

Conversations from the Four Rivers Region

Posts Tagged ‘Good Read

Good Read – Bossypants by Tina Fey

leave a comment »

Bossypants
by Tina Fey

Buy this book on Amazon

(Your purchase supports WKMS!)

Product Description:

Before Liz Lemon, before “Weekend Update,” before “Sarah Palin,” Tina Fey was just a young girl with a dream: a recurring stress dream that she was being chased through a local airport by her middle-school gym teacher. She also had a dream that one day she would be a comedian on TV. She has seen both these dreams come true. At last, Tina Fey’s story can be told. From her youthful days as a vicious nerd to her tour of duty on Saturday Night Live; from her passionately halfhearted pursuit of physical beauty to her life as a mother eating things off the floor; from her one-sided college romance to her nearly fatal honeymoon — from the beginning of this paragraph to this final sentence. Tina Fey reveals all, and proves what we’ve all suspected: you’re no one until someone calls you bossy.

Jenni Todd says:

If you like to laugh, then please, read Bossypants! It’s Tina Fey’s “kind-of” memoir published last year. While I loved the show biz highlights about Second City, SNL, and 30 Rock (and cutie Alec Baldwin), I really connected (and laughed hysterically) with her reflections on being a young woman, a wife, and a mother. Near the end of the book there is a chapter titled, “The Mother’s Prayer for Its Daughter” that had me rolling in the floor unable to breath. It’s three pages of comedy gold for men and women, daughters and sons, mothers and fathers.

Book’s now in paperback. Here’s last year’s interview with Terry Gross.

Click here to check out more Good Reads.

Written by Matt Markgraf

January 24, 2012 at 3:49 pm

Good Read: Killing Lincoln

leave a comment »

 

Killing Lincoln
by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard

Buy this book on Amazon

(Your purchase supports WKMS!)

Product Description:

The anchor of The O’Reilly Factor recounts one of the most dramatic stories in American history—how one gunshot changed the country forever. In the spring of 1865, the bloody saga of America’s Civil War finally comes to an end after a series of increasingly harrowing battles. President Abraham Lincoln’s generous terms for Robert E. Lee’s surrender are devised to fulfill Lincoln’s dream of healing a divided nation, with the former Confederates allowed to reintegrate into American society. But one man and his band of murderous accomplices, perhaps reaching into the highest ranks of the U.S. government, are not appeased. In the midst of the patriotic celebrations in Washington D.C., John Wilkes Booth—charismatic ladies’ man and impenitent racist—murders Abraham Lincoln at Ford’s Theatre. A furious manhunt ensues and Booth immediately becomes the country’s most wanted fugitive. Lafayette C. Baker, a smart but shifty New York detective and former Union spy, unravels the string of clues leading to Booth, while federal forces track his accomplices. The thrilling chase ends in a fiery shootout and a series of court-ordered executions—including that of the first woman ever executed by the U.S. government, Mary Surratt. Featuring some of history’s most remarkable figures, vivid detail, and page-turning action, Killing Lincoln is history that reads like a thriller.

Kate Lochte says:

My mother-in-law and sister-in-law hesitated in recommending Killing Lincoln to me because Bill O’Reilly co-wrote it. They thought that since I work at an NPR station and enjoy listening to it that I wouldn’t read anything by Mr. O’Reilly of Fox News.

But I am on a Civil War reading jag – about to dive into Volume 2 of Shelby Foote’s Trilogy. I heard Steve Innskeep’s interview with O’Reilly and quite frankly, wish I could do another one and ask him all the questions I have now about how one goes about co-writing like this.

Last December descendants of John Wilkes Booth agreed to exhume his remains for DNA sampling to see if it matches vertebrae taken from Booth’s body and saved in a medical museum in Washington, not on public view. In the Afterword of Killing Lincoln, this is among the tantalizing questions asked: Why has there been no subsequent reveal of the test results?

Why did nothing happen to the Presidential guard assigned to watch the box at the Ford Theatre who left his post and was drinking in the tavern next door when Booth shot Abraham Lincoln?

Whatever happened to 18 pages of John Wilkes Booth’s writings after the assassination that were seized after Booth’s death and given over to Secretary of War Edwin Stanton for safe-keeping? Stanton never could not explain the missing pages. Why did Secretary Stanton hire a discredited private eye to engage the search for Booth after the assassination?

You can hear Bill O’Reilly’s voice in the narrative style – calling attention to GOOD and EVIL, exhortative, excited, and precise. There’ve been some complaints about the fact-checking of the book and it’s not foot-noted, thank goodness! The Afterward gives a fine list of books and sources which the authors consulted. Killing Lincoln is a quick read and scenes like the surrender at Appomatox come alive visually. I really enjoyed it.

Click here to check out more Good Reads.

Written by Matt Markgraf

November 16, 2011 at 2:40 pm

Good Read: A Sand County Almanac by Aldo Leopold

leave a comment »

A Sand County Almanac
by Aldo Leopold

Buy this book on Amazon
(Your purchase supports WKMS!)

Product Description:

Aldo Leopold’s A Sand County Almanac has enthralled generations of nature lovers and conservationists and is indeed revered by everyone seriously interested in protecting the natural world. Hailed for prose that is “full of beauty and vigor and bite” (The New York Times), it is perhaps the finest example of nature writing since Thoreau’s Walden. The heart of the book remains Leopold’s carefully rendered observations of nature. Here we follow Leopold throughout the year, from January to December, as he walks about the rural Wisconsin landscape, watching a woodcock dance skyward in golden afternoon light, or spying a rough-legged hawk dropping like a feathered bomb on its prey. And perhaps most important are Leopold’s trenchant comments throughout the book on our abuse of the land and on what we must do to preserve this invaluable treasure.

Lauren Taylor says:

Here you are, this collection is a way to reconnect with nature through the eyes of a conservationist/ minimalist. Leopold speaks to the natural rhythms of the land, and shows the reader patterns humming about us, widely unnoticed. It’s like taking the most wonderful expedition without leaving your favorite reading nook. :)

Click here to check out more Good Reads.

Written by Matt Markgraf

October 7, 2011 at 3:06 pm

Good Read – Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

leave a comment »

Treasure Island
by Robert Louis Stevenson

Buy this book on Amazon
(Your purchase supports WKMS!)

Product Description:

The discovery of a treasure map sets young Jim Hawkins in search of buried gold, along with a crew of buccaneers recruited by the one-legged Long John Silver. As they near their destination, and the lure of Captain Flint’s treasure grows ever stronger, Jim’s courage and wits are tested to the full. Robert Louis Stevenson reinvented the adventure genre with Treasure Island, a boys’ story that appeals as much to adults as to children, and whose moral ambiguities turned the Victorian universe on its head. This edition celebrates the ultimate book of pirates and high adventure, and also examines how its tale of greed, murder, treachery, and evil has acquired its classic status.


Matt Markgraf says:

In honor of International Talk Like A Pirate Day this week, I wanted to share some thoughts on a great, timeless classic: Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson. Many classics can be somewhat of a chore: a feeling like one “should” or “ought” to read rather than for enjoyment. Not the case here. The book is a breeze. It has a rich, brooding atmosphere comparable to the works of Edgar Allen Poe, particularly in describing Jim Hawkins’ fearful distance from the pirates and relief when overcoming obstacles. What’s working here is Stevenson’s ability to scale back, carefully revise and penchant for atmospheric flair.

This masterful narration brings to life the foreign, fantasy-like setting of Treasure Island and aboard the Hispaniola. He makes you feel like you’re there: “The glow of the sun from above, is a thousandfold reflection from the waves, the sea-water that fell and dried upon me, caking my very lips with salt, combined to make my throat burn and my brain ache.” G.K. Chesterton famously wrote that Stevenson “seemed to pick the right word up on the point of his pen, like a man playing spillikins (pick-up sticks).” Read the first page of Treasure Island, you’ll agree.

The best part of all is, of course, the pirates. Inspired by both facts and folklore, Stevenson’s pirates are shanty-yodeling, rum-soaked scoundrels with peg-legs, parrots and an affinity for saying “Arrr!” The characters, Black Dog, Billy Bones, Israel Hands, Ben Gunn and last but not least Long John Silver, are as memorable as their 21st century descendents in the Pirates of the Caribbean films. Not a line of their dialogue goes by without that gravelly, swaggering tenor, especially when they break out into a “yo ho ho and a bottle of rum” song. You know you want to sing it… Go ahead.

Click here to check out more Good Reads.

 

Written by Matt Markgraf

September 20, 2011 at 4:57 pm

Good Read – Bright’s Passage by Josh Ritter

leave a comment »

Bright’s Passage
by Josh Ritter

Buy this book on Amazon
(Your purchase supports WKMS!)

Product Description:

Henry Bright is newly returned to West Virginia from the battlefields of the First World War. Grief struck by the death of his young wife and unsure of how to care for the infant son she left behind, Bright is soon confronted by the destruction of the only home he’s ever known. His only hope for safety is the angel who has followed him to Appalachia from the trenches of France and who now promises to protect him and his son. Together, Bright and his newborn, along with a cantankerous goat and the angel guiding them, make their way through a landscape ravaged by forest fire toward an uncertain salvation, haunted by the abiding nightmare of his experiences in the war and shadowed by his dead wife’s father, the Colonel, and his two brutal sons.


Rose Krzton-Presson says:

Josh Ritter’s debut novel Bright’s Passage is not a disappointment for fans of his music. His prose echoes the intricacy of his song lyrics and Ritter seems to have mastered delicately juxtaposing everything in this book. Henry Bright is able to face his murderous family members, but is terrified at the thought of raising his newborn son alone. The story is able to whip back to a misty Appalachian morning after an explosive scene in muddy trenches of France during WWI. Set in West Virginia, Bright’s Passage is steeped in Ritter’s true Americana style with a sense of upstanding nobility given to the local culture. The book also brings religion and morality into question. With a guardian angel (or a hallucination of a talking horse brought upon by PTSD, depending on the reader’s interpretation) that doesn’t always keep Bright out of harm’s way, Ritter presents a very interesting religious situation, with no particular slant. The freshman novelist has room to improve. Bright’s Passage has some some loose ends and fuzzy plot points. But if Ritter’s last decade of musical growth is any sign of his writing improvements to come, he is sure to join Twain and Poe as one of the great American artists.

Check out our Good Reads page for more recommended books.

Written by Matt Markgraf

August 31, 2011 at 12:01 pm

Good Read – The Sisters Brothers

leave a comment »

The Sisters Brothers
by Patrick deWitt

Buy this book on Amazon
(Your purchase supports WKMS!)

Product Description:

With The Sisters Brothers, Patrick deWitt pays homage to the classic Western, transforming it into an unforgettable comic tour de force. Filled with a remarkable cast of characters–losers, cheaters, and ne’er-do-wells from all stripes of life–and told by a complex and compelling narrator, it is a violent, lustful odyssey through the underworld of the 1850s frontier that beautifully captures the humor, melancholy, and grit of the Old West and two brothers bound by blood, violence, and love.


Matt Markgraf says:

I read this on the spurs from this year’s great western flicks: True Grit and Cowboys vs. Aliens. The Sisters Brothers is a sharp-tongued, gallows humor bloodbath that goes down smooth and strong like fine brandy. It’s Quentin Tarantino absurdism, following around Charles and Eli Sisters, two hired gunslingers on a mission to hunt down Herman Kermit Warm. I was often shocked by the brothers’ punishing sense of justice and judgment, yet I found myself nodding along, ensnared by the not so fair-handed reasoning of Eli Sisters. The Wild West was a free-for-all and the Sisters had an oddly charming way of collecting their entitlements. The emotion and action in this story is finely, finely tuned. You will hate the brothers, love them and most of all be absolutely riveted by the story’s poignancy.

Check out our Good Reads page for more recommended books.

Written by Matt Markgraf

August 24, 2011 at 11:59 am

Good Read – I Am Not The Same Girl: Renewed

leave a comment »

I Am Not The Same Girl: Renewed
by Stacy Lattisaw Jackson

Buy this book on Amazon
(Your purchase supports WKMS!)

Product Description:

“I Am Not The Same Girl: Renewed” is the life story of Stacy Lattisaw. As a young Rhythm and Blues (R&B) singer, she completed a total of 12 albums and toured with Michael Jackson and the Jacksons. She traveled the world as a singer and shared the stage with artists such as Aretha Franklin, Natalie Cole, Teddy Pendergrass, Stephanie Mills, Johnny Gill, and a host of others. As she began to mature in age and mind, her desires began to change and she cried out to God and asked him to fill the void in her life. Soon after Stacy walked away from the secular music world and dedicated her life to the Lord. Today she is renewed and walking in the destiny that God has set for her life.

Brian Clardy says:

West Tennessee did not have the type of cosmopolitan glamor of its more urban counterparts, but young people were still able to stay current on the latest music by innovative artists. Whether it was Prince, the Rolling Stones, or the Charlie Daniels Band, area listeners bought records by artists that appealed to their imagination and sense of having good clean fun. One of those artists was Stacy Lattisaw.

Brian Clardy spoke over the phone with the author about her book.

Click here to listen to the interview.

Check out our Good Reads page for more recommended books.

Written by Matt Markgraf

July 11, 2011 at 11:45 am

Good Read – Sinatra! The Song Is You

leave a comment »

Sinatra! The Song is You: A Singer’s Art
by Will Friedwald

Buy this book on Amazon
(Your purchase supports WKMS!)

Product Description:

Frank Sinatra remains the greatest entertainer of our age, invigorating American popular song with innovative phrasing and a mastery of range and emotion. Drawing upon recent interviews with hundreds of his collaborators as well as with “The Voice” himself, this book is the only full-length work to chronicle, critique, and celebrate his five-decade career. Friedwald examines and evaluates all the classic and less familiar songs with the same astute, often witty, perceptions that earned him acclaim for Jazz Singing. With an authoritative discography and rare photos of recording sessions and performances, Sinatra! is an invaluable resource for enthusiasts and an unparalleled guide through his vast musical legacy.

Todd Hill says:

Excellent book about the singing career of Frank Sinatra. Skips the all-too-often sensationalized aspects of his personal life and concentrates on his apprenticehip as a band singer (with Harry James and Tommy Dorsey), the era of “The Voice” on his Columbia Recordings with arrangements and orchestras led by Axel Stordahl, the Capitol Recordings with Nelson Riddle, Billy May and Gordon Jenkins and the Reprise years with diverse writers/leaders such as Neal Hefti, Johnny Mandel, Quincy Jones and Count Basie. If you only know the Sinatra of “Strangers in the Night,” “My Way” and “New York, New York” – not to mention the dreadful and over-produced “Duets” CDs of the 1990s – then educate yourself with this book and seek out the worthy recordings. Sinatra, more than any other performer, defined the “Great American Songbook” and many of his recordings are definitive.

Check out our Good Reads page for more recommended books.

Written by Matt Markgraf

June 20, 2011 at 11:45 am

Good Read – Killing Mister Watson

leave a comment »

Killing Mister Watson
by Peter Matthiessen

Buy this book on Amazon. 
(Your purchase supports WKMS!)

Product Description:

Drawn from fragments of historical fact, Matthiessen’s masterpiece brilliantly depicts the fortunes and misfortunes of Edgar J. Watson, a real-life entrepreneur and outlaw who appeared in the lawless Florida Everglades around the turn of the century.

Kate Lochte says:

“Matthiessen tells a story of a man thought to be a killer who is eventually killed by a mob. Matthiessen’s narrative flows through fictional voices of early twentieth century residents of the Ten Thousand Islands on the west coast of Florida adjacent to the Everglades. There are some gruesome and unaccountable murders in it as well as a devastating hurricane. Dark, moldy, itchy. The swamplands are miserable, yet fecund. ‘In the hurricane’s wake, the labyrinthine coast where the Everglades deltas meet the Gulf of Mexico lies broken, stunned, flattened to mud by the wild tread of God. Day after day, a gray and brooding wind nags at the mangroves, hurrying the unruly tides that hunt through the broken islands and twist far back into the creeks, leaving behind brown spume and matted salt grass, driftwood.’ This is an example of Matthiesen’s fine and true crafting of setting for this haunting, slowly told examination of character that took me a couple of years to finish. Mathiessen sets the hook and lets you play out the line until you’re reeled back in and landed at the finish.”

Check out our Good Reads page for more recommended books.

Written by Matt Markgraf

March 14, 2011 at 11:59 am

Good Read – Battle Cry of Freedom

leave a comment »

Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era
by James McPherson

Buy this book on Amazon. 
(Your purchase supports WKMS!)

Product Description:

James McPherson’s fast-paced narrative fully integrates the political, social, and military events that crowded the two decades from the outbreak of one war in Mexico to the ending of another at Appomattox. Packed with drama and analytical insight, the book vividly recounts the momentous episodes that preceded the Civil War including the Dred Scott decision, the Lincoln-Douglas debates, John Brown’s raid on Harper’s Ferry. From there it moves into a masterful chronicle of the war itself–the battles, the strategic maneuvering by each side, the politics, and the personalities. Particularly notable are McPherson’s new views on such matters as the slavery expansion issue in the 1850s, the origins of the Republican Party, the causes of secession, internal dissent and anti-war opposition in the North and the South, and the reasons for the Union’s victory.

Todd Hatton says:

“I think anyone who completes a reading of James McPherson’s 869-page Battle Cry of Freedom could be forgiven for feeling as though they themselves have lived through the U.S. Civil War. But that’s not a bad thing. In fact, it’s enlightening. And it’s largely due to McPherson’s thorough and compelling history of the events and issues leading up to, and beyond, the war. McPherson’s fellow historians, along with reviewer after reviewer, have found Battle Cry to be the indispensible single-volume history of the conflict. For what it’s worth, I’ll add my voice to the chorus. If you haven’t read it, your understanding of the war is at best incomplete.

“Southern apologists have taken issue with McPherson over the causes he gives for the Civil War, misunderstanding or mischaracterizing his study as a simplistic contest over slavery. They argue the conflict was more accurately a principled dispute over sectional economics and political philosophy. A reading of Battle Cry of Freedom makes clear the problem with that thesis. The causes of the Civil War really were many and complex, but African slavery lies at or near the roots of any cause the South cared to name. McPherson makes it clear: no slavery in America would likely have meant no American Civil War. And what’s worse (well, for southern apologists, Lost Cause advocates, and neo-Confederates, at any rate), is that McPherson meticulously sources his work from the words of the southern secessionists themselves. It’s awfully hard to argue that the war wasn’t about slavery when Jefferson Davis, Alexander Stephens, Robert Toombs, and Edmund Ruffin say it was.

“Nevertheless, Battle Cry of Freedom is not a political tract. It is a rich account of a quintessential American identity crisis. Who are we as a nation or a people? And who do we want to become? Prior to 1861, we referred to ourselves as Kentuckians, Tennesseans, and Illinoians and said that the United States are. It wasn’t until after 1865 that we began calling ourselves Americans, saying that the United States is. This book is a profound insight into why.”

Check out our Good Reads page for more recommended books.

Written by Matt Markgraf

March 10, 2011 at 11:59 am

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 31 other followers